More on the department of education and their weapons

Thanks to the fine people at CATO, we now know why the department of education was serving a search warrant. They, along with the 30 other inspector generals were granted full police power by the Homeland Security Act of 2002. It isn’t clear how many of those organizations have taken advantage of this law, but it will be interesting to see if the Department of Labor, The Export-Import Bank of the US, or even the Tennessee Valley Authority will be serving search warrants SWAT style. Usually I’d laugh, but none of those are more ridiculous than the department of education arming themselves and busting down doors. thank goodness the department of education is leading the way in the fight against terrorism…

Comments 3

  • Don’t their warrants still need to have just cause and be signed by a judge for them to lawfully execute the warrant.

  • Well sure. I haven’t heard anyone questioning the legality of this raid, but people are wondering about the legal framework that makes this possible. We should wonder what insanity caused the arming the Department of Education. Reasonable minds could also wonder if that said armed department breaking down doors, humiliating an innocent man and scaring the daylights out of his kids is really what we want the department of education doing. Armed raids are dangerous, they should be reserved for dangerous people. White collar crimes should not be pursued with deadly force, especially when innocents are around.

  • And on top of that, armed raids should be left to actual law enforcement agencies. There is the suspicion that the Dept. of Education did this because they could, there certainly doesn’t seem to be any cause for them to use the tactics they did. If they were worried about dangerous people, why not hand it over to the police or FBI? A state trooper division would have served the warrant with far less fanfare and risk.

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